Flight Sergeant Kenneth Ingram  -  50 Squadron  
   

Flight Sergeant Kenneth Ingram - RAFVR

 

 On 21/22nd June 1944,LancasterI LL840 VN-M took off from Skellingthorpe for an op to Scholven-Buer.It crashed at Oene (Gelderland),5 km E of Epe after being shot down by a night-fighter. Six of the eight man crew were able to egress the aircraft however, Sergeant Shorter and W/O Lane were killed and rest in the general cemetery at Epe, the rest of the crew either evaded capture or were taken prosoner.

The crew consisted of:

Name

 Service

 Hometown

Age

S/L T.B.Cole - POW

RAFVR

-

-

F/Sgt Kenneth Ingram - EVD

RAFVR

Portsmouth

19

F/O Jack Craven - EVD

RAFVR

-

-

F/Sgt A.G.Beresford - POW

RAFVR

-

-

P/O Eric.J.Blakemore - EVD

RAFVR

-

-

W/O John Lane

RAFVR

Battersea, London

22

Sgt Frederick Shorter

RAFVR

Wellingborough, Northants.

24

Sgt P.F.Hayes - POW

RAFVR

-

-

 Flight Sergeant Kenneth Ingram was to fall into the hands of the Gestapo and shot on the 1st of October 1944, he rests in the Apeldoorn (Ugchelen-Heidehof) General cemetery.

 He was found by the Dutch Resistance after parachuting to safety  and taken to Jachtlaan 134,Apeldoorn, the house of Ms Narda van Terswiga,(one of the leaders of a resistance group called "Vrije group Narda") and a Mrs Bitter-van-Noodaa. 

 In August he was to be joined by Sergeant Robert Archer USAAF from Pennsylvania , a gunner on a B17 Flying Fortress, who had baled out near Laren, several kilometres east of Apeldoorn The resistance group was active in helping Allied airmen and Jews and faking passes and the delivery of food stamps. Both airmen were still in Apeldoorn at the end of September when a Dutchman, William L’ecluse, keen to avoid being called up for forced labour and unaware that the two airmen were being sheltered by Mrs Bitter-van-Noodaa, betrayed the section of the underground to which he and Mrs Bitter-van-Noodaa’s son, Joop, belonged.

 In the late afternoon or evening of 30th September, acting on information supplied by this traitor, the Gestapo raided Jachtlaan 134, seizing the two airmen who were in civilian clothes. They also found six resistance members. Wim Aalders, Jan Barendsen, Reinier van Gerrevink, Wim Karreman, Jan Schut and Hans Wijma. All were executed the following day.

 On the second of October 1944 the eight men were moved to "Het Apeldoornsche Bosch" by a company of NCO’s recruited from a Waffen-SS Landesschutzenbattalion. Their bodies were left on the streets of Apeldoorn with the label "Terrorist" around their necks. Flight Sergeant Ingram’s body hung on the corner of Deventer Street with Archer on the same street opposite the post office. This was a clear reaction by the Germans to the resistance in the Apeldoorn area

 Also hiding in Apeldoorn at this time were two other members of the crew W/O Craven and P/O Blakemore.They were in hiding at Frieslaan 5,the home ofde Vries,a chocolate manufacturer. They successfully evaded capture.

 Mrs Bitter-van-Noodaa was taken to Camp Ravensbruck where she was to die on 6th January 1945

 Narda van Terwiga who had also been moved to Ravensbruck was freed by the Allied Forces on 25th April 1945.

 On October the 2nd 1969,a simple white memorial stone was unveiled with the names of Sergeant Zercher,Flight Sergeant Ingram and the the Dutch resistance workers at Heerenloo inscribed upon it.

 In 2008 Jan van Griethuysen came across a copy of the book The Black Arrow by Robert Louis Stephenson at a local market in Holland. Inside the cover of the book was a certificate indicating that it had once been given to Kenneth Ingram while he was attending school in Southhampton. Incredibly, after writing a letter to the Portsmouth News indicating his find and wish to return the book to Kenneth's family, the book was returned to Kenneth's cousin just a few months later.

Articles in the Portsmouth News: May 2008 (left) and August 2008 (right)

Photos courtesy of Michael Allman & Roger Ingram, Jelle Reitsma, Teunis Nooteboom, Jan Kiezebrink. Special thanks to “Footprints on the Sands of Time” by Oliver Clutton-Brock, research by Linda Ibrom.