Preparation
  Sergeant John Troman - 427 Squadron  
 

Sergeant John Lewis Troman - RCAF 

 

 Sergeant John Lewis Troman was serving as Wireless Operator on 17/18th of August 1943 aboard Halifax Mk.V DK243 coded ZL-F when it took off from Leeming at 2125hrs. It was part of an operation to destroy the secret research centre at Peenemunde where the Germans were developing the V2 rocket. The raid was a success and delayed production of the V2. After the Halifax had bombed the target, it was attacked by a JU88 night-fighter. The Halifax attempted to dive and escape but was hit by fire. The order was given to bale out and the Halifax crashed at Wusterhausen,3km South of Lubmin. Five of the seven men aboard were killed, including Sgt John Troman.

The crew consisted of:

Name

Service

Trade

Hometown

Age

Sgt Francis Brady

RCAF

Pilot

Quebec City, Quebec

21

Sgt Ifor Pugh

RAFVR

Flight Engineer

Bontddu,Merionethshire,Wales

19

Sgt R. Charman - POW

RCAF

Navigator

-

-

Sgt R. Johnson - POW

RCAF

Bomb Aimer

-

-

Sgt John Troman

RCAF

W/Op/AG

Lethbridge,Alberta

28

Sgt Orville McIntyre

RCAF

Air Gunner

New Norway, Alberta

27

Sgt James Fletcher

RCAF

Air Gunner

-

 Sgt John Lewis Troman as the eldest son of Samuel and Louisa (nee Moore) Troman of Lethbridge, Alberta. His father, Samuel immigrated to Canada from Sunnybrow, Co Durham, working as a mines inspector, fighting in WW1, in the Canadian Army Signals Corps, before being wounded and discharged in 1918.

 On December 25th 1941 John married Jessie of Vancouver, British Columbia. He enlisted in the RCAF in 1942, training as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner before joining 427 squadron at Leeming, England.

 While in England, John was to visit his relations including his grandmother, Margaret Troman

John with brother Sammy

 His brother Sammy, also a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner in the RCAF was killed three months later in November 1943. One other brother, Louis, also enlisted as a Wireless operator/Air Gunner in 1942,serving overseas and returning to Canada in 1945. He died in 1978.

John  Troman's grave.

 
  Photos courtesy of  Eileen Carkett & Malcolm Brooke, research by Linda Ibrom.